Usually, we focus on getting more traffic to our handmade shops online.

However – have you ever thought about your conversion rate?

Out of the traffic you get through your virtual door – how many of those potential customers become actual customers?

In today’s episode, I’m going to be sharing 8 possible reasons why your shop is struggling to convert those visitors into customers.

If you’ve ever asked yourself ‘I’m getting all these visitors, but no-one is buying… why?’ – then this episode is for you.

If you’ve never calculated your conversion rate before, there’s a handy formula further down – make sure to check out what YOUR conversion rate currently is – and see if it’s something you need to work on improving.

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Quotes and highlights from this episode:

 

  • First – know your conversion rate. If you’re seeing less than 2 percent and your conversion ask isn’t significant, you’re likely facing a conversion problem

  • (Number of sales you get per month / number of visitors to your site per month) x 100 = your conversion rate as a percentage

  • Bad photography/lacking photography (size, in situ)
  • Descriptions that lack crucial detail (not answering common objections/questions)
  • Overly complex checkout process
  • Website is difficult to navigate/poorly designed
  • Lack of trust (not having https for example, no reviews, no real name)
  • You aren’t marketing to the right people (ideal customer)
  • Mismatch between price and perceived value
  • Choice paralysis (too many options)

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