Success Stories ~ Stacie of Gingiber

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Stacie of Gingiber with her hands full of pillows

When I started my own shop on Etsy, I looked up the best sellers in illustration and found Gingiber’s shop right near the top.  Her whimsical drawings were selling like hotcakes and I knew in that instant that I wanted to be just like Stacie in a few year’s time.  Stacie recently launched a new website for her work and I knew she’d be a great maker to interview.  You’re going to love the story of how she’s juggling her full-time work with two kids and an academic husband.  It just goes to show you that even the big guns struggle with balance.  Hehe.

Can you take us on the journey of your creative career path so far?

I have always wanted to be an artist and eventually studied design and fine arts at a university in my hometown. But after graduation, I sort of “put off” pursuing art and instead moved up in management at a national coffee chain. I spent several years working erratic hours, and along the way got married and had my first child. It was around the time that my daughter was born that I was searching for artwork for her nursery, but nothing really suited my taste. So instead I put that old art degree to use and created my own prints. My husband encouraged me to try and sell my artwork and soon thereafter opened up a shop on Etsy. Gingiber was born.

For the next several years, I worked on Gingiber at night after my daughter would go to bed, all the while dreaming that I could create art full-time. My husband was a grad student at this time, so leaving a steady job (with insurance) in order to work on Gingiber was really not an option. That was until I became an Etsy featured seller in the winter of 2011. I had given birth to my 2nd daughter 2 weeks before my feature went live and suddenly Gingiber exploded! In January of 2012 I gave my notice at my day-job and my dreams suddenly became a reality.

Now not only do I run Gingiber full-time, but I have a lovely group of ladies who work part-time for me in order to keep up with shipping, fulfilling wholesale orders, and generally keep me organized. Gingiber is now sold in 50+ stores worldwide, and my Etsy sales are steadily increasing. Creatively I feel so full! And I feel like these are the good times, so I am trying desperately to cherish them.

What has been the biggest challenge you’ve overcome so far in your business?

Finding time to create is so difficult. My husband just completed his PhD this past December, and with 2 little girls to take care of, I struggle with finding the balance of time. Also over the holidays, I had to handle a situation where a large Korean company stole my best selling orange fox pillow design and were replicating it in their factories for a fraction of the price that I can afford to sell them. However, through the power of social media, myself and the other artists who were also affected by this staged a large campaign to move for the removal of our products. Within 24 hours my pillow was removed from the site. I haven’t checked again to see if they are selling it again, but honestly that was such a stressful situation with a remarkably swift and positive outcome.

What has been the biggest ‘fist-pump’/successful moment for you so far?

Hmmm. That would probably be my Etsy Featured Seller feature in 2011. It gave me the courage and momentum to believe that I could illustrate full-time.

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Owl Tote Bag

Do you ever have doubts as to your future creative direction?

Yes, I have struggled with what direction to take Gingiber. Being the type of illustrator that I am (appealing to a wide audience) I have recently decided to stop focusing exclusively on nursery decor and am trying to become more of a lifestyle brand. I am the type of person who has 100 ideas an hour, so figuring out the right direction to take my business is hard. I am actually currently working with Grace Kang of Retail Recipes. She runs a retail consulting business and it has helped me tremendously to identify the strengths of my business & how to grow in the right direction.

Are there things you yearn to achieve, but haven’t yet found the time for?

Yes! I desperately want to turn my 52 Weeks of Dogs illustration project into a book, but haven’t had the time to shop around the idea to publishers. Also, I dream of someday working with big brands like Urban Outfitters, Land of Nod, etc. on an art licensing level. All of this will come in time.

Are there times when your creativity and inspiration seem to disappear? How do you handle that?

Absolutely! I find that I am so connected to my business that if I have a slow month of sales I become despondent & discouraged. But I have been trying to approach these slower times as opportunities to hold “flash sales” or work on a new project. Also whenever I am just in a creative funk, I try to change up my routine. That seems to help me get out of a creative block!

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Custom Pet Portrait – Greyhound

How do you balance your work with the rest of your life ~ what does a typical day in your life look like?

Since my husband works in academics, my schedule is tied to the school calendar. Every day I wake up around 6 AM. My husband and I make breakfast, get the kids dressed and out the door by 8:30. I’m fortunate the my oldest (Violet)  attends a free pre-school, so every day from 8:45-3:45 she goes to school. My youngest (Lucy) goes to a Kid’s Day Out 12 hours a week. So that 12 hours is when I get the lion’s share of work done.

I lease some office space near my home, so on those days that Lucy is at KDO I drive to Gingiber World Headquarters and fill orders. I have a part-time worker (Vanessa) comes into the office 2 days a week to ship Etsy items. I also have a part-time gal (Angela) who helps me sew pillows. And most recently I hired my sister (Angie) as my virtual assistant. I do anything from sew pillows, fold tea towels, print artwork, fill wholesale orders, etc. Anything that I can squeeze into my 4 hour block of time I get done.

When 2 o’clock rolls around, I lock-up shop & pick up Lucy from KDO. Soon thereafter we are back in the car picking up Violet from pre-school! Then I make after-school snacks, start dinner, and hang out with the family. By 7 PM the kids are in bed & then I start working again from home. I usually get my drawing done for new ideas in the evening hours, accompanied of course by a French Press and some Netflix. It is really a blur of a day.

What has been the best marketing move you’ve ever made for your own business?

Partnering with blogs has been a valuable way to gain new customers. But definitely I get the best customer interaction from social media, specifically Instagram. I post on IG daily with sneak peeks behind the business. I launch new products there, host Flash Sales, and gain a great sense of what Gingiber customers are interested in. I LOVE INSTAGRAM!

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Giant Handmade Sheep Pillow

What is one piece of advice you’d like to give fellow makers about running a successful creative business?

Love what you do & share it with others. This is something that was drilled into my head when I worked for Starbucks, but it completely rings true. I love what I make. It makes me happy. I couldn’t imagine doing anything else for a living, and for the 1st time I feel really and truly happy creatively. Also, plug into a creative community. Passion is contagious, so surround yourself with other makers who are also passionate about their work. Having a creative community is important when you are dealing with the day to day trials of running your own business. I have found an amazing group of makers on Twitter. Everyday we encourage each other, share our daily frustrations, and sharpen each other. It is wonderful!

Where do you see yourself in 5 years time?

In 5 years I want to be more in the “creative chair” of Gingiber. I have more ideas than I have time to draw! In 5 years I hope to have some great licensing contracts with some of my favorite brands. And I want to see Gingiber products in retailers across the globe. Oh, and I want to publish books. And why not throw a fabric line in there, too? I like to dream big and work backwards.

You can find more of Stacie’s work on her website: www.gingiber.com

Success Stories ~ Polli

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Maja and Tess of Polli

I love finding new handmade companies that make me stay on their website for nearly an hour oohing and ahhing over their products.  Polli grabbed in me a few weeks back and I knew I needed to contact them so I could share their advice on running an extremely successful business with you!  Maja and Tess were sweet enough to agree.  You’re going to enjoy this interview on how these two ladies went from full-time jobs in design consultancies to full-time jobs for themselves.

Can you take us on the journey of your creative career path so far?

Maja and I studied Industrial Design at UTS in Sydney. We loved working together and collaborated at uni and became great friends. After graduating we were both lucky to secure full-time jobs in design consultancies, mine from a part-time job during uni and Maja’s from a prize we’d won from the Design Institute of Australia. The only problem was that they were competing consultancies with strict confidentiality. So we started a hobby on the side, with the vision that we could make things for our demographic, that were fun, usable and affordable. Polli grew for about 4 years very much as a weekend hobby while we worked-full time. It was a great luxury as we could reinvest any profits back into the business as we had full-time jobs. In 2007 Polli had grown into such a demanding hobby we had to choose between it and our day jobs and we took the plunge into full-time Polli. It was an exciting and liberating experience and in our first year we went on our first international trip to a trade show in NY and we had a team of friends working part-time. In 2008 we moved into our studio in Stanmore where we are today, still designing and making products with a great group of friends.

What has been the biggest challenge you’ve overcome so far in your business?

In 2012 Maja moved to the US with her family and we’ve been working long distance ever since. It’s tricky running a small business this way but we’re intent on making it work as we feel we have a unique partnership with great complimentary skills.

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Sweet Polli Babushka Pendant

What has been the biggest ‘fist-pump’/successful moment for you so far?

Probably moving into our studio in Stanmore. It was a huge achievement to move ‘out of home’ and really love this space. It’s a converted ginger beer factory with lots of great salvaged timber, exposed brick walls and polished concrete floors. It feels like a creative little oasis amongst the busy inner west.

Do you ever have doubts as to your future creative direction? Are there things you yearn to achieve, but haven’t yet found the time for?

Brands do need to evolve their aesthetic and we’re in the process of exploring new materials and products. It’s a really exciting time to think we can do something new but it’s also been strange to start a blank canvas with no knowledge of different industries.

Are there times when your creativity and inspiration seem to disappear? How do you handle that?

Certainly I think that happens to all designers but we’re lucky to be in a partnership and have a great team around us to bounce ideas and bring new inspiration.

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Australiana Tape

How do you balance your work with the rest of your life ~ what does a typical day in your life look like?

Having children has really changed our work / life balance. (Tess) Generally we start the day early (like all mums), we’re often walking our dogs or enjoying a family breakfast. I’m at the studio just after 8am and the rest of the team arrive within the next couple of hours which gives me time to catch up on emails and plan my day. We have deliveries daily of new stock or samples so we’re often reviewing them over a cuppa. Chatting with suppliers and customers. Designing something: either a new product or something simple like a newsletter. We’re always busy on facebook and instagram, sharing our story with our lovely customers. I’m always home by 5 to start the kids’ dinner and catch up with them before bedtime.

What has been the best marketing move you’ve ever made for your own business?

Two words: Pistol. PR.

Kate does an amazing job promoting Polli to the press because she really understands Polli and has worked with us for a long time.

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Wooded Hexagon Beaded Necklace

What is one piece of advice you’d like to give fellow makers about running a successful creative business?

Don’t try to wear all the hats. It’s often good to know when to call in experts like photographers, book keepers, web developers so you can get the best results and focus on the things you love and are really good at.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years time?

Still here in our sunny studio, working side by side on new and exciting products. Travelling the world to promote our collections and visit customers and being inspired all the way.

You can find more of Polli’s work online in their shop

On Instagram

And on Facebook

Introducing my Mentee – Stacey from Max & Me Designs

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Today I have a special someone to introduce to you all!

When I ran the inaugural session of Set Up Shop, I let it be known that I would be choosing one of my students to mentor for 3 months. When the course came to a close, I set about the tricky job of picking one person from my 75-strong class of wonderful women to work with one-on-one. It was a difficult decision, because so many of them are passionate, hard-working, dedicated, and giving.

In the end, I made my choice… and today I am very pleased to introduce my new mentee to you all – the lovely Stacey from Max & Me Designs!

Stacey makes wonderful and unique art from vintage postage stamps, as well as postage stamp jewellery and a few other bits and pieces. I am impressed by what she’s managed to achieve in the short time she’s been in business, and I reckon she’s just going to go from strength to strength.

I asked her if she’d be happy to share her journey over the next few months while we work together, so today she’s going to tell you a little bit about her business and how it began…

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How did Max & Me Designs begin?

Like many businesses in the handmade community, Max & Me Designs began by accident. I was cleaning out the cupboard in our new nursery/old junk room when I came across some stamps that I had collected as a child. After spending a few moments looking through the pages of the album and reminiscing about my childhood inspiration struck! I decided to use some of the stamps to create a piece of art for my new little baby boy, Max. I loved the idea that I could take something special from my own childhood and upcycle it into a keepsake gift for him. Little did I know that this very moment would set me on a path to creating my own business.

Fast forward a year down the track and Max & Me Designs is now a successful small business featuring a unique range of art, jewellery and giftware which have been handcrafted using upcycled postage stamps from all over the world.

I love being able to take something so small and insignificant as a postage stamp and reincarnate it into something truly beautiful and unique that will be treasured by its owner.

Every piece is a one of a kind and I often have customers who buy them as keepsake gifts to celebrate birthdays, christenings, Christmas, wedding anniversaries (1st anniversary is paper), Mother’s Day, Father’s Day or the arrival of a new baby.

What was the motivation for starting your business?

Like many new mums I found the first few months of maternity leave very isolating. While I loved being at home with my new little baby I was used to talking to people all day long and being busy, busy, busy! Suddenly I was at home by myself and I missed the mental stimulation of working and being around people.

Several of my friends had commented on Max’s artwork and suggested that I try selling the designs online. I figured I had nothing to lose and set up online shops on the Etsy and Made It sites. I also set up a Facebook page for Max & Me Designs which is where I discovered the AMAZING community of handmaidens!

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What has been your favourite part about the journey so far?

My favourite part of running a handmade business would have to be connecting with so many new people. It’s been wonderful getting to know my customers, Facebook fans and fellow small business owners over the past year. I love interacting with my fans on Facebook and find it to be such a beautiful, supportive community. It’s due to their support, and that of my family and friends, that Max & Me Designs is where it is today.

I have also met some very generous philatelists who have donated thousands and thousands of stamps! I have several people who regularly send me envelopes filled with exotic stamps from all over the world, including one lovely grandfather who regularly sends huge envelopes of stamps from his collection. I feel as though they are entrusting me with a part of their lives that is very important to them and I feel very honoured that they appreciate and value the designs that I create.

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What do you think the future holds for Max & Me Designs?

Wow, this is the big question, thank goodness I have Jess to help me along the way!

With Jess as my mentor and the very generous business grant from Renata at Forming Circles I’m hoping to take Max & Me Designs to the next level by further developing the product range and spreading the word far and wide.

I would like to extend my social media networks and finally getting onto Twitter… I would also like to increase the number of retail outlets which carry my products and try my hand at some of the larger design markets in Melbourne and possibly interstate.

The key thing that I have learnt from the past year is that anything is possible if you put your mind to it, after all what have you got to lose?

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P.S. Term 2 of Set Up Shop will run this July! I will, again, be choosing a student to mentor for 3 months. If you’re ready to craft an online business and shop that will rock your socks, make sure to sign up here to find out when registration opens.

Success Stories ~ Cath of My Bearded Pigeon

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Cath of My Bearded Pigeon amidst her wares

When I first started selling on Etsy, I quickly found the shop of My Bearded Pigeon, one of the top sellers.  Her pillow covers  were so beautifully photographed, it was easy to see why everyone wanted on them for their home.  When Jess asked me to come up with a list of full-time makers to interview for Create & Thrive, I knew this Aussie seller HAD to be right near the top of my list.  I’m so happy today to share the advice of Cath from My Bearded Pigeon.

**Cath also wanted to give Create & Thrive readers a special treat!  Use the coupon code CTFRIENDS in her Etsy shop for 15% off!**

Can you take us on the journey of your creative career path so far?

I have always liked making things, from a really young age I loved craft. It was always what I did but because I was never good at drawing in the sense of ‘draw this bowl of fruit so it looks exactly like the bowl of fruit’. I never saw myself as artistic. Looking back I would have loved to study fine arts after high school but due to my lack of drawing skills, I didn’t.

Fast forward a hundred years and a move from the inner city of Sydney to a town of 2,000 people, and I find myself at home with a baby. I am a bit bored. I am completely in love with my baby and so happy but I feel so idle, and I keep looking at baby toys and clothes and thinking how all the stuff I can afford is so hideous and all the stuff I want is so expensive. So I start sewing simple clothes and toys for my baby and I discover crafty blogs and Etsy and chunky chooky  is born…. as my baby became a toddler and then a little girl I realised I wanted to do something for grownups. Then one night I had the idea of putting maps onto cushions and My Bearded Pigeon was born.

What has been the biggest challenge you’ve overcome so far in your business?

Actually seeing it as a real business. When I started My Bearded Pigeon I was still in lala land about record keeping, etc.  I was quite half arsed about it, but very quickly My Bearded Pigeon got busy and I had to get serious about keeping records of expenses and GST and get ready for BAS, etc. SNORE!!! After a visit to the accountant – who is great – he suggested I make my husband my business partner and he could cook the books so to speak (he is a chef, see that hilarious pun). I think the accountant saw my eyes glaze over every time he started to explain things to me…

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Giant Vintage World Map Floor Cushion

What has been the biggest ‘fist-pump’/successful moment for you so far?

Having my cushion featured on the front cover of Real Living magazine.

Featured seller on Etsy was also so exciting – although the timing was horrific I had the worst morning sickness/ tiredness and it was so busy – there was a lot of tears! But it was great!!

Having 2 of my cushions in the Taubmans’ ad campaign which meant huge exposure with my cushions in the paint sample books in every Bunnings Australia wide.

Do you ever have doubts as to your future creative direction? Are there things you yearn to achieve, but haven’t yet found the time for?

SO MUCH!!
I want to improve my photography skills.
I want to be a whiz at Photoshop and Illustrator.
I want to learn graphic design.
I have an idea bursting in my head but it’s beyond Etsy really….. And I am still looking at HOW to do it in an eco way.

Are there times when your creativity and inspiration seem to disappear? How do you handle that?

Not really, I always have lots of ideas… It’s important to let you mind wander I think… I spend a lot  when it’s just the baby and me in silence. No TV, no radio, etc. I think that helps new ideas float into your head.

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Hangry Decorative Pillow Cover

How do you balance your work with the rest of your life ~ what does a typical day in your life look like?

BALANCE is typing this one-handed on my iPad while I breastfeed the baby.

A typical day is:
Awake  to baby gurgles, crawl from bed and start encouraging the 6 yo to get dressed, brush her teeth, etc. while shoving food and coffee into me and simultaneously reading the SMH online, breastfeeding, and getting ready to leave the house. Walk to school which involves a big hill.

Then I collect stock from the studio (We built an amazing studio for me so the baby could have her own room. I don’t get to go down there much at the moment as it’s too far from the house to leave her in here asleep by herself so I go to and fro a lot and she sleeps with us but I am so glad it’s all finished!) to either cut fabric for sewing or pack orders.

Then it’s just all that mum and baby stuff: feeding, playing, reading, singing, taking photos,  having silly and inane texts with Neil that make me laugh, reading articles online so my brain doesn’t stop working, reading blogs… more baby stuff…..checking emails, maybe meet a friend for a coffee. If the baby has a sleep in the afternoon, not on top of me, then I will do some more MBP stuff as well as running around like a crazy person washing dishes, wrestling the washing piles, sweeping up the tumbleweed size dust balls. Neil gets home with our daughter at 3:30 and the whole homework, reading, feeding, bathing, etc. routine starts again. Once my daughter is home from school MBP is on hold until the next day.

What has been the best marketing move you’ve ever made for your own business?

I am not a fan at all of Facebook. I don’t like some of the groups they allow and I hate the bullying that can go on so I am not great at maintaining my Facebook page and I am often confused about how it all works…. but from a marketing perspective, it is potentially amazing!

However, I do like twitter. Yes, there is the same amount of bullying but you don’t see it in the same way. You only see the comments made by people you follow (except for re-tweets) but I just find it a lot less frustrating than FB and I have had some great exposure. I ending up talking to Shaynna Blaze one night on twitter and she  used my cushions in a nation-wide Taubmans campaign. I have also had a few people with a lot of followers RT something I have said… this CAN lead to people looking at your profile and then hop skip jump to my Etsy shop, or they start following you and will work out what you do eventually….. so  I would have to say Instagram as well has been great marketing. I put all new products on there and I get instant feedback and a lot of sales from the people I know via instgram, many of whom I met through blogging.

I have heard twitter and instgram referred to as microblogging, I agree, I do like that about it but, you cant just tweet or IG your wares, its so boring when people do that! Did I answer the question? Yes: twitter and Instagram but see below!

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Pixel Rose Decorative Pillow Cover

What is one piece of advice you’d like to give fellow makers about running a successful creative business?

I can’t stop at one!

Ask yourself :

  • Is there a market for what I am making?
  • How many other people are making stuff like this?
  • What is my point of difference?

Have excellent branding, logos etc. if this means paying someone then do it. I met the graphic designer I still work with via etsy, she helped me with my chunkychooky logo, 5 years ago. I cannot stress to you enough how important I think this is. Have things professionally printed, business cards ( I use moo) which I put a hole in and also use as hangtags. I have sew on labels made too. Have everything consistent with the same name. So your twitter, FB, IG, blog etc all has the same name. The name must be catchy I think. Easy to spell and easy to remember… Think outside the box a little you are creative so be creative with the name! If I called my business Cath Young Homewares… its just not very interesting is it? When you come up with something Google the name to see if it is taken!

This horrible word ‘networking’ I do not like this word. I heard someone describe it as you need to form relationships with people and be authentic. Be real. I totally agree. I get regular sales from people that I ‘know’ via social media, its really nice, I buy there stuff too. I think if you are going to be running a handmade business its great to shop handmade too and generally support handmade.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years time?

(My baby will be starting school and I will be crying!!)

I will still be learning and hopefully my business will still be growing. To be honest I don’t really know, but that’s exciting I think!

You can find more of Cath’s work on her website: My Bearded Pigeon

In her Etsy shop

On Facebook: My Bearded Pigeon

On Twitter: @mybeardedpigeon

On Instagram: My Bearded Pigeon

In her sometimes shop of random goodness

And on her blog: Chunky Chooky

Success Stories ~ Love Mae

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Emily and Peta of Love Mae

Almost immediately after I teamed up with Jess for her *bespoke* magazine, I discovered Love Mae and fell head over heels for their work.  This Aussie duo creates the most beautiful fabric wall stickers, wallpaper, and now dinnerware.  I don’t know anyone who wouldn’t want a little piece of their work in their home.  When I reached out to them, I never in my wildest dreams imagined Emily and Peta would actually let me interview them!  So get ready for a truly amazing interview with the team behind Love Mae.

Can you take us on the journey of your creative career path so far?

Mae turns 4 soon, so its been quite the journey. Some days it seems that it was only yesterday that a couple of us met up and fantasized over the idea of working for ourselves creating gorgeous products. Originally we planned on doing wallpaper, cushions, and lampshades, which is why we use so many patterns in our decals. Once we entered the world of Love Mae, inspiration came from everywhere and soon our fantasy was alive. I still can’t believe how much we’ve learnt and where Love Mae has taken us.

What has been the biggest challenge you’ve overcome so far in your business?

The biggest challenge was doing the things that took us out of our comfort zone. Between us all we had loads of skills, but so much we had to learn along the way. Trying to have a professional front when you are not feeling professional is super awkward. We still face challenges every day, but now we know that the quicker we tackle them, the quicker we can move back onto the fun stuff.

What has been the biggest ‘fist-pump’/successful moment for you so far?

Our first trade show! It was mind blowing what we achieved. It was also the moment that we all came on board full time and could proudly say that we worked for ourselves. It was great to stop the juggling and start the joy. We’ve since done trade shows in Sydney, Melbourne, London and New York. I think the travelling is sometimes my favourite part.

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Bamboo Dinner Set – Woodland Creatures

Do you ever have doubts as to your future creative direction? Are there things you yearn to achieve, but haven’t yet found the time for?

Every day! Doubt is such a negative force and can sometimes take extreme measures to shift. Doubt can hinder intentions, so its really important to decipher between doubt and real instinct. There is so much to achieve and so little time so work time is best being productive. There is so many things I yearn to achieve, but I make the time everyday even if it is five minutes to open another part of me. I’m self taught with most things in my life, so study is the next big thing I’ll achieve.

Are there times when your creativity and inspiration seem to disappear? How do you handle that?

Always. Creativity comes and goes. I definitely think it is so closely linked with confidence. When I’m feeling uninspired I take a moment to myself and walk on an empty beach or enjoy a moment on Pinterest. It quite quickly comes back, but you’ve got to be so careful not to be hard on yourself. I love the cliche Rome wasn’t built in a day… but usually substitute Rome with Love Mae.

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Fabric Wall Stickers – Floating Feathers

How do you balance your work with the rest of your life ~ what does a typical day in your life look like?

I’ve got two little girls, 4 and 7, so balance is just as much an artwork as Love Mae. I never wanted to work for myself and lose my time with children so I take this balance challenge on as much as I do anything else. My morning involves getting children ready for school and pre-school.. packing lunches making breakfast. I usually arrive at work around 9.30. A day in the studio is so dramatically varied I never really know what will happen. The only thing I know is the times I need to pick my girls up. I then do the homework thing, play and craft time dinner and baths and books and bed. Most nights I must admit I find my way back to my laptop where the work continues again. I don’t mind this and I make sure I keep the night work interesting. I do remind myself that it will always be there tomorrow if I don’t feel like working. A good thought is … ‘whats the worst than can happen if I don’t get it done’. This usually keeps it real for me.

What has been the best marketing move you’ve ever made for your own business?

In the early days, communicating with good blogs. We really can thank the blogging world for our success… that and our launch pad, Etsy. Bloggers are direct into the homes of our favourite market… New mums! We now have a PR agent and she’s amazing. I must admit I now have a lot of nights off not having to worry about getting our images out there. A PR agency was a great move!

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Wrapping Paper – Stormy Bouquet

What is one piece of advice you’d like to give fellow makers about running a successful creative business?

Keep a balance. You can’t always do just the fun stuff and be successful, especially in the early days. Enjoy being out of your comfort zone. Life is about learning and keeping both sides of the brain alive. Set yourself goals and then break them down to bite size pieces. Keep your ‘to do’ list real and achievable as you are always your biggest critic and if you are not achieving your weekly list you’ll soon talk yourself out of your own success. You can do this!

Where do you see yourself in 5 years time?

I’m a big ‘future goal’ setter! I love a big picture. In 5 years I see myself in a bigger warehouse with dedicated staff all wonderful in their area of expertise. I like to think I’ve created a lovely work place where we have a rule… life and family come first. I’ve got so many ideas and they will probably take 5 years to all come to fruition. But definitely Love Mae will be grandeur with lots of new pretty goodies available. I’m excited.

You can find more of Love Mae’s work in their online shop: Love Mae

On their Facebook page: Love Mae

And on their blog: The Love Mae Blog

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